Projects


Why Read If I Can Build? Digital Games and Web 2.0 for Science and Math Learning

 

This program investigates new learning practicies to enhance equity in math and science by harnessing the power of contemporary games and Web 2.0 for deept learning. The primary goal of this program is to develop and examine a gender-inclusive learning world, Gaming: Learning-As-Doing (GLAD), grounded in enactivism. In this learning world, students will work as ‘game designers’ and be immersed in a world of pleasurable, rewarding, and engrossing action through which they learn math and science from designing, developing, and assessing games for others to use. A secondary goal is to explore, through the lens of this learning world, game-based learning design methods, processes, and theory focusing on math and science education.

 

Gaming and Web2.0

 

Sponsor: SSHRCC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada)

 

Can Digital Games Help Save Lives on Canadian Roads?

Effectiveness of Games and Web2.0 in Enhancing Drivers’ Knowledge of Road Rule


Road crashes are a leading cause of death and serious injury and extract a high cost from society. Understandably, driver errors have been attributed to be the biggest (90%-95%) contributor to crashes. Logically, an adequate and updated knowledge of the road rules is essential for drivers to drive safely.

This research project develops and tests a game-based program to enhance players’ knowledge of the road rules. This program also examines the effectiveness of “learning as game playing/designing” by immersing learners in a world of pleasurable, rewarding, and engrossing action through which they learn safety rule and comparing their pre and post knowledge levels with a control sample of learners using the conventional method of learning by reading the Driver’s Handbook. Further, it explores, through the lens of this learning world, game-based learning design methods, processes, and theory focusing on road safety training.

 

Road Safety and Gaming

 

Sponsor: SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada)

 

Digital Games in a Participatory Culture


Learning Library is a framework Application Program Interface (API) developed at the MIT Comparative Media Studies to help teens learn the New Media Literacy skills in a participatory culture. Funded by UC and MIT, we investigate how middle school students use Learning Library in classrooms and in what ways the use of this tool impact students’ learning of math, science, and technology. Focusing on girls with low socio-economic status (SES), we are particularly interested in two aspects: digital games and learning in a participatory culture.

 

Sponsor: University of Calgary & MIT

 

 

 

Digital Games as Design Experience


This study is grounded in enactivism focusing on the integration of digital games and web 2. 0. Specifically, we seek to understand:

  1. the impact of a learning environment based on enactivism using to support math/science learning;
  2. best practices in educational games;
  3. game-supported learning design methods, processes and theory; and
  4. challenges and strategies for the design and creation of such learning environment.

Adapting the “learning-by-designing/building” approach, we use Scratch, a programming language developed at MIT, for both formal classroom setting and afterschool programs.

 

Sponsor: University of Calgary

 

 


 
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